New Steampunk Series Slated: “Nightshade” Author Andrea Cremer Strikes Big Deal with Penguin

Published by:  Penguin Group
Pages: 480
Genre:  YA fiction
Released:  June 2010
Summary:
“Nightshade” ~ Calla is the alpha female of a shape-shifting wolf pack. She is destined to marry Ren Laroche, the pack’s alpha male. Together, they would rule their pack, guarding sacred sites for the Keepers. But then, Calla saves a beautiful human boy, who captures her heart. Calla begins to question everything – her fate, her existence, and her world and the orders the Keepers have asked her to follow. She will have to make a choice. But will she follow her heart if it means losing everything, including her own life?
 
  1. NOTE from the Dame:
Media Bistro’s,”Galley Cat,” newsreporter Maryann Yin has released yet another scoop detailing author, Andrea Cremer’s deal with Penguin for a steampunk series!  Given Cremer’s success with “Nightshade,” I can only grit my teeth and yearn for the release of the first book!
But, first, here’s one of Yin’s interviews with Ms Cremer, who’s just a young adult, herself talking about “Nightshade”~
 
Interview with Andrea :  October 22, 2010
 
Andrea Cremer (pictured) did that in her debut novel, Nightshade. She used her scholarship and research to incorporate social issues about gender, power struggles, and sexuality into her book. We caught up with Andrea to find out a little bit more.
 
 
Q: Nightshadeis about a werewolf. How do you stick to conventional werewolf canon and mythology and how do you deviate?A: One of the things about Nightshadethat I think is really different is that it’s described as a werewolf book, but I often tell people it’s not a werewolf book because it does break so much from werewolf convention. I grew up in the north woods of Wisconsin. I’m literally right on Lake Superior and in the middle of a national forest, so the wilderness to me was something that was really wonderful. I spent most of my days as a young girl out making up imaginary worlds and imaginary people with my brother and my best friend in the forest. That was the way we liked to spend our days.Wolves and other wild animals to me were always fascinating; they weren’t something that were scary or monstrous, they were just cool. And so, I never pictured myself actually liking werewolves in terms of people picking teams for either vampires or werewolves. In all my reading, I had always firmly been in the vampire camp. I couldn’t figure out why it was that I didn’t like werewolves.

So when I got the idea for Nightshade and it was inspired by the main character, Calla [Tor] who is the alpha female wolf of the pack, I knew she was a girl and I knew she was a wolf. I felt just stuck because ‘Well, I don’t like werewolves so how am I going to write a book about a girl who’s a werewolf?’ And I realized what I needed to do was to create a new mythology of wolves that matched the way I felt about them.

That wasn’t wolves who were half-man/half-beast and its hideous mutations where it took an awful amount of time to change that involved the cracking of bones and lengthening of snouts and left you with something that was just awful to look at. But, was actually a creature that was fully wolf and fully human; Calla and her pack love their ability to change into wolves. That it was an instantaneous change and something they considered to be a gift; that it wasn’t a disease or a curse the way so many werewolf mythologies have been portrayed.

Q: How do you handle writing about touchy subject matters like the violence, gender issues, power struggles, and sexuality featured in Nightshade?

A: I have a “day job.” It’s definitely more than a day job; I’m a history professor. I have a PhD in early modern history and my research specialization is the history of sexuality and violence, particularly the way it ties into warfare and religion. So just in studying the history of gender politics and sexuality for the last ten years, it was what I wrote my PhD on. It’s something that I have just been aware of in all the historical research I’ve done as a major under-fitting of the construction of human society. To write a story that was largely about power and struggles for power. It’s a coming-of-age story about this girl’s sexual awakening and her struggle to maintain her identity despite external forces that are trying to limit her strength.It was so important for me to have those issues at the forefront because I think books offer a really important safe space for people of all ages, teens especially because they really need those spaces but I think adults as well. To be able to reflect on the way society puts expectations for sexuality and gender out there and try over and over again to thwart them. Sometimes it’s in very subtle ways through media and pop culture. Other ways it’s very overt in actual forms violence for people who step out what are considered to be societal norms. I really wanted to not be afraid to touch on those issues, not just even touch on them but really explore them.In the book, I really wanted to address sexual double standards for young men and young women. It’s such a huge, huge problem that’s infuriating. More and more women are strong and in positions of power in society, yet still we have an attitude of girls have to be responsible for their sexuality but boys will be boys. I just feel like that happens over and over again. The recent slew of stories about texting scandals and bullying in schools towards LGBT students, but also straight students, the blame is almost always put on the girls for not being sexually responsible and not acting like good girls. And for boys it’s just, ‘Oh, boys will be boys. Of course, they’re going to spread around this scandal because they’re boys.’ I feel like that is something that hurts our society so much and sends a terrible message to girls about trying to figure out who they are and what their place can be in the world. I just really wanted to hit on those issues without fear.

Q: What courses do you teach at Macalester College?

A: I teach courses on violence in early American history (colonial through the Civil War), gender and sexuality, Native American history, historical philosophy and methodology, and religion in early modern history (1500-1800).Q: Describe your writing process.A: My writing process is really chaotic. I don’t write chronologically. I write scenes as they come into my mind. So what I do is, the key conflicts and key points tend jump into my head as I’m thinking about the story. I just write them down as I feel them. I feel like I almost go into a trance when I write; it takes over my entire life. When I’m in the middle of writing a first draft it happens very quickly. I wrote the first draft of Nightshade between Thanksgiving and Christmas Day. There’s a lot of revising that happens after that, but the initial process is just all consuming. I’ll do things like pour orange juice on my cereal, throw clothes into the trash instead of the laundry hamper, or get into the shower and get right out again having totally forgotten to wash my hair because I’m just so lost in the story. When I write, I basically create those major scenes and then it’s almost like a web of thinking about how they’re connected. I refer to myself as jigsaw puzzle-writer because I end up with all these pieces and then it’s fitting them together to make the story.

Q: What are the differences between writing academic papers and fiction novels?

A: In academic writing you make an argument and defend it using evidence that other scholars can track, vis a vis footnotes. When writing a novel I’ve found that my process is much more about being carried away by the story rather than deconstructing its content.Q: What plans do you have for future projects?A: Nightshade is a trilogy. The second book Wolfsbane will be published in July 2011 and book three, Bloodrose, is due out spring 2012. The fourth book is a prequel to the series that chronicles the origins of the Witches War in the 1400s. I’m working on a steampunk trilogy that I describe as historical dystopia about an alternate 19th century where the American Revolution failed. The steampunk is not as yet under contract.

Full Disclosure: This GalleyCat Correspondent has been an intern at Penguin Group (USA) in the past
Now:  Maryann Lin’s Newest Article:  September 27, 2011Nightshade trilogy author Andrea Creamer has inked a deal with Penguin Group (USA)’s Philomel imprint for a new YA steampunk series.

The first book, titled The Inventor’s Secret, is slated for publication in fall 2013. Executive editor Jill Santopolo negotiated the deal with InkWell Management literary agents Richard Pine and Charlie Olsen.

Here’s more from the release: “The series is set in an alternate nineteenth-century North America where the Revolutionary War never took place and the British Empire has expanded into a global juggernaut propelled by marvelous and horrible machinery…As part of the deal, Philomel has also acquired a second prequel to Nightshade entitled RISE, which is scheduled for publication in summer 2013. The first prequel to Nightshade,entitled RIFT, is scheduled for publication in fall 2012.” (Photo Credit: Gina Monroe)
 
In addition to the Nightshade prequels, Cremer will wrap up the trilogy with Bloodrose which will be released in January 2012. She also has a collaborative book project with Will Grayson, Will Grayson author David Levithan in the works; this project is called The Invisibility Curse and will be published in 2013.

The Dame’s Final Word:My thanks to Maryann Lin and Andrea Cremer for sharing this great news with those of us who love her books!  Meanwhile, any of my readers who’ve missed reading “Nightshade,” need to catch the wave!

I saw her final book in this series at the bookstore yesterday. The covers are going to look gorgeous on library shelves, y’all!

You really have to go to Amazon to see the book write-up.

Deborah/TheBookishDame

“Megan’s Way” ~ A Novel of Eternal Love, Friendship, Death & Dying by Melissa Foster

Book Notes

“Megan’s Way is a fine and fascinating read that many will find hope in.” Midwest Book Review


The Megan’s Way film will be entered in the Sundance Film Festival, Cannes Film Festival, South By Southwest Festival (SXSW In Austin Texas), Amsterdam Film Festival, as well as New York, LA , and Miami (just to name a few). This is a “Fest-Best” type of film and expected to make a major impact on festivals world wide.

My Review:

I first want to share with my readers the personal perspective I bring to this review of “Megan’s Way.” Some 29 years ago I was widowed as a young woman with three children under the ages of 9. My precious young husband died of melanoma that had metastasized to major organs: we had several months to prepare for his death. This came after the original cancer of 11 years in the first year of our marriage. So, I’m someone well acquainted with cancer’s toll on a person and those who love them. I read this book with that intimate awareness.

Melissa Foster has given us a true-to-life rendering of the process of dying. From the earliest stages of the person’s acknowledgement of impending death, to their release of loved ones, their body and spirit; to the angst and responses of those who live with and love them, Ms Foster paints a portrait of the struggles and survivals. She understands the pain of those left behind and the awareness of those who have to do the leaving.

 Through her very beautiful and tender portrayals, we come to know Megan and her intimate friends as if they were family. We get a clear and close up understanding of Megan’s loving and tumultuous relationship with her teen aged daughter, Olivia. And, we are given unique insights into Megan’s personality, thoughts, fears and death and dying processes from her own perspective, as well as from the perspectives of her friends and daughter. Ms Foster is spot on in her every detail of this experience with death, in my experience. 

I found Melissa’s writing, however, to be somewhat stilted in her efforts to get across all the points of the process, and then the major theme of the choices we have about our own death and dying. There is something lost in the flow of a story as the book progresses when it starts to be overtaken by a series of details on these numerous processes and points of dying, rather than having it more balanced within a storyline. This, however, does not take very much from the book or enjoyment of it in total, since I think it’s worthy on many other levels.

While Megan considers her options of ceasing any other chemo or “prolonging” measures, and as she also contemplates the virtues of taking into her own hands the method and timing of her death, we are allowed to witness her conflicts. This option to choose is one that many come face-to-face with. Ms Foster gives us a balanced and open view of a woman who looks boldly into the face of death, weighs her options and takes into loving consideration the daughter she will leave behind.

The complexity of “Megan’s Way” made this novel one that I loved reading. Certainly, it rang true to me in so many ways. It also touched my heart with its attempts to bring readers into a center of meaning and choices that will be an evitability in most of our lives.

The intertwined tale of friends and surrogate family lends itself to be a realistic possibility in light of the “secrets” that people tend to hold close in relationships. While one is living, the secret is easily kept and the “family” can pretend to overlook and rationalize…but once a foundational/pivotal person is going to be removed–the structure that holds it all together is jeopardized and must be delicately “readjusted.” This is an element I’m also familiar with, personally, and one I thought Ms Foster handled elegantly.

I recommend your choosing to read “Megan’s Way” before it’s made into the movie for the Sundance Film Festival. It’s going to have a great impact! And, it’s a very enjoyable read on the order of a Jodi Picoult novel.

Strongly urge you to read more about Melissa Foster and her outreach programs, her book “Chasing Amanda,” her soon to be released book, and her social community for women called “The Women’s Nest.”

http://www.melissafoster.com/


4.5 stars from TheBookishDame

Jodi Picoult’s New Novel, “Sing Me Home” Live Video and Release!

Tuesday, March 1, 2011

Jodi Picoult’s “Sing You Home” Live Interview!!! March 1, 2011 Release

Jodi Picoult releases her 17th novel and all we can do is wait in line to be the first ones to grab a copy!  On March 7th, at her Opening Reception in New York City, Jodi will be answering questions about “Sing You Home,” and I’ll have the live video on this blog.  So exciting for me to be a part of it.  I was thrilled to get an actual invitation to the event, itself, but travelling isn’t possible for me, so I’m left to use this method of communication instead.  I love Jodi and Simon & Schuster!!!
If you link to http://www.simonandschuster.com/ you will see some pre-publication video by Ms Picoult with regard to “Sing You Home,” and her personal connection to the story. One of her sons is gay and through him the family has been introduced to unique experiences.  The family is fiercely supportive of who this young man is.
After having read some of the book at this point, (I was given a pre-publication copy of it….so grateful!) I’ve found it in the best tradition of Jodi Picoult’s writing.  Just makes one want to stay up 24/7 reading.  She’s written this one from a perspective of her own heart, however, which gives it a certain depth of feeling that I believe we’ll find unique.  I have a feeling this book will be one her fans will rank as her best to date.
Along with her novel, Ms Picoult has collaborated with her dear friend, Ellen Wilber, to create a companion soundtrack!  How unique in the industry…or, as I quote another author friend of mine…”the brave new world of publishing” is upon us.  This beautiful recording, which Ms Wilber performs and has written the music for, and for which Jodi has written lyrics, is an accompaniment for each of the chapters of “Sing You Home.”  I’m distracted by singing when I read, so I’ve opted to listen after I’ve read a chapter.  It will be interesting to see how you feel about this, and how it’s used by readers in general.
As a sneak preview, I would like to give you the publisher’s synopsis of the novel:
In the aftermath of a series of personal tragedies, Zoe throws herself into her career as a music therapist.  When an unexpected friendship slowly blossoms into love, she plans for a new life, but to her shock and inevitable rage, some people–even those she loves and trusts most–don’t want that to happen.
Sing You Home is about identity, love, marriage, and parenthood.  It’s about people wanting to do the right thing for the greater good, even as they work to fulfill their own personal desires and dreams.  And it’s about what happens when the outside world brutallly calls into question the very thing closest to our hearts:  family.”
 
 
I will be posting my full review of  “Sing You Home” in a few days.  I hope you’ll come back on the evening of March 7th, at 7PM to watch the live video with me!
*On another note~ I’ve failed to keep current on my blog reviews due to a nasty bout with a pneumonia virus.  I’m better and hoping to catch up this week!  Thanks for checking in with me.
 
 
Please leave me your comments.  I so appreciate hearing from you!  And, please check in as a “follower,” which is also so important for me.  It’s nice to know you’re out there!  Thank you for stopping by,
 
 
Your Bookish Dame,     Deborah

“Houses”~A Nostalgic and Brilliant Novel

“Houses” is about the many beautiful, enduring and literally earth-shattering epidodes that women and men experience in life. It’s how the locust-like numbers of “baby boomers”…in our gusto for living, for challenge and change, helped bring about impassioned awareness, and long standing, meaningful new ways of living in our generation…not just social unrest, mindless war, entitlements and greed. And, we continue to effect social, spiritual, political and cultural change even today.

Ms Parks processes the conflicts of being a woman during the turbulent years of the mid-to end of the 20th century. Specifically, we follow the life story of Lacey Winters, a girl whose growing up years to current “golden years” will leave a lasting impression on readers of all ages.

Readers are taken on a nostalgic trip through childhood days of playing outside with neighborhood friends, the Kennedy and Martin Luther King days, civil and women’s rights, the Viet Nam War, the bliss of first love, and the self-affirming conviction of being politically active for the first time. We come to know and love her family members, her friends both male and female and her loved ones.

We relive Lacey’s agonies, [the agonies we, ourselves, may have endured, possibly still do!] to be a “good Mom” while minding the house and budget, working for a pittance at a boring/stagnant job, and trying to take one or two classes at a time to finish a college degree so that some day it might be possible to become what she “is.” All of this only to find herself alone and most of those she loved gone by the time she “got there.”

Ultimately, Lacey does find a satisfaction from things fought for and won, and they give some consolation keeping her in the game, though the questions and conflicts of the nature of being a nurturer and/or a concerned parent still linger even to our childrens’ generation.

In chosing the title, “Houses,” Ms Parks chooses a metaphor relating to the different houses either lived in, toured, loved or hated, by Lacey to define the stages of her life, and the expressions of her “self.” This brilliant symbol leaves an indelible mark, causing us to examine ourselves in the same context. Parks is a powerful writer.

I want to leave these quotes of so many brilliant ones in this novel:

“Maybe I’m naive, but I’m hopeful that our daughters and granddaughters will find it easier. The internet and telecommunicating now offer the promise, not just of a greener way of working, but of an avenue, for both men and women, to productive and fulfilling work that doesn’t require abandoning the home, especially the children, whose needs don’t always correspond to nine to five scheduling. We have the Family Leave Act now and the notion of daycare in the workplace seems less radical. The stay-at-home dad is not such a joke.”

and:        

” This, chickadees, is (sic) the things about happiness.  You must take it where you find it.  Don’t question or second guess or wish for minor modifications.  Laugh, eat, joke.  Bounce the baby on your knee.  Don’t look forward or back.  Keep your eyes focused on the faces around you.  One of them may be missing come next year. Come next year everything may be entirely different.  Memory may have to darken your perfect day with its tincture of melancholy and the happiness will never seem so clear and real again…Should you find yourself happy, as happy as I was that Thanksgiving Day, don’t even think. Just be….Eat all you want”

This book is brilliant and readable. Ms Parks is a writer you’ll not soon forget.
While we sit on the cusp of the lst quarter of the 21st century, I know many of us will never rest on the footings we’ve gained in so many areas of our American lives…I hope and pray our children and grandchildren will continue to walk with us.

Deborah/TheBookishDame

“The Last Train from Paris” ~ Love, Art and the Resistance ~ WWII

The Last Train from Paris”~Love, Art and Parisian Patriots in WWII

A novel about Paris, not just the beautiful “City of the Lights,” but a city captured and terrorized in the grip of a hostile German army in WWII, this is a book I couldn’t help dying to read. I love Paris above all European cities, and my heart just stops at the thought of anyone destroying a single piece of its architecture or fine arts.

So, I could hardly wait to tell you that this book will leave you breathless and pensive. From the very first paragraphs you will be taken in to the epic story of lovers and liars, artists and anti-heros…

Stacy Cohen paints with a gentle hand and delft stokes the story of an occupied Paris that is so confined and crippled that you feel the constraints of it as you read. We come to know and love favored contemporary artists Miro and the grumpy but irrepressible Matisse, who take under wing the talented but fledgling young artist, Jean Luc Beauchamp.

Jean Luc becomes the hero of this story as we follow his passions of art, true love for a beautiful Russian ballerina with a secret, and love of Paris…all elements of the human story and the battle of good vs. evil. Ms Cohen also provides us a German Oberst officer villian to heat up the struggles. He’s interesting, darkly intriguing and easy to hate.

A novel that will set you adrift into another time, “The Last Train for Paris,” will catch you up in a story that will rush over your heart and bring you to tears. It is a story that will create a righteous indignation about the savaging of the arts, and the art thefts of WWII. And, it is a novel that will remain with you should you visit Paris or when you think of its beauty and many treasures.

Hopefully, you will never find yourself taking the last train from Paris…but always going toward Paris. It is the most beautiful and mysterious of European cities. Just like cities all over the world in these times and in the past, it is worthy of our concerns and protection.

I’m grateful to Ms Cohen for reminding me of that. It took many brave hearts in the Resistance to liberate Paris and France from a hostile enemy. Theirs is a story that is beautifully rendered in “The Last Train from Paris.”

Highly recommended and timely.

****
Since Ms Cohen is a most admirable woman in every respect,  I wanted to add this very interesting information about her for you:
 
“Stacy Cohen, author, philanthropist, and life-style consultant continues to bring her passion for love and life to everything she does.  With her first novel, she creates a distinct voice that combines her passions for art, history, and the undying power of love….
In the world of international philanthropy, she has been a tireless advocate of children, including her support of Camp Okizu, the largest camp in Northern California for children and their families affected by cancer.  She has raised hundreds of thousands for children’s hospitals and funded a special performance by the Russian National Orchestra in support of Russian orphans, bringing her love for children and her passion for the arts full circle.”
 
Your Bookish Dame/Deb

“Swallow” A Novel by Tanya Plank

Tanya Plank is a fantastic writer of the young, priviledged, slightly disturbed and disoriented New York professionals. She’s the voice of the over-educated, preppie, ivy-leagued-to-the-max, “now what do I do to one-up everyone” generation. She “gets it” and she’s telling!! LOL

I thought her author’s voice–her book was hilarious and riveting! It helps to know these Harvard-types she writes about, but I think anyone can understand a pompous person when they see or hear one…or read about them. Her characterizations are golden. Sophie, the swallower in question, is a loveable and genuine young woman for whom I immediately took a liking. I was on her side right away and kept by her like a glove to her hand throughout her struggles and humorous/humiliating revelations.

Tanya is right on in her dialog and descriptions; particularly in her scene at the fancy art show with Sophie’s fiance’s Harvard friend, Alana. Oooo, as slick and slimy as they come in a tightly wrapped ivy package. As well as with Sophie’s own would-be friend, Samia, who keeps referencing herself and Sophie as “when you’re young,” as if to say she is now so mature and beyond it all–and that living and working in New York for even a short time has jaded and matured them like hot house roses….which it may, in fact, have done. At the very least it’s caused Sophie to choke, hasn’t it?

It’s caused Sophie to revisit a childhood dysfunction…a fist-sized ball (FB) that blocks her esophagus and causes her to choke, actually not being able to swallow anything but tiny bits of food, drink or even her own saliva. Sophie is struck again by her swallowing FB shortly after her boyfriend proposes, and prior to a big Public Defender’s Office advocacy case that she must orally present before a presumably hostile, multiple Justice panel.

Sophie is diagnosed with a psychological problem called Globus Sensate, but not before it has run amock within the strictly held confines of her fragile life. Sophie’s secrets of the pornographer father, the wacky sister who pops in to humiliate and horrify…and the fiance’ who can’t believe his eyes, ears and understanding about the FB!!!…all make for a fun ride!!

I loved Tanya Plank’s book. I loved NYC through the eyes of the Arizona girl and the Yalie mix. I loved the story through the words of a choking, swallowing dysfunctional lawyer!!! LOL What could be better than the image of a poor lawyer who can bearly talk for choking on her words! (with apologies to my sons)

This is a wild and fun romp full of satire, symbolism and insight into the lives of the educationally priviledged and spoiled vs the “real” people. It’s a look into the workings of the public defender’s life and the big city lawyer’s mindset. It’s a glance at the young bucks and brave girls who come to Town with all the credentials and hautier but missing some of the heart and raw bones of real life. And, a look at the other young “brave ones” who come hoping to make a difference against some mighty odds that aren’t in their favor.
This is a book that’s easy to swallow. Though, I have to admit, I suffered with Sophie when she was having problems swallowing. I felt myself closing up. I found myself putting my hand to my throat and getting a smothering feeling and practicing swallowing, myself. That’s how good Tanya Plank is at writing!

You have to get this book. Ms Plank is going to be heard from again, and you’re going to be listening and loving her!! Just like I do.

“Dragon House” A Healing Love Story in Viet Nam

“Dragon House,” is a novel of exceptional beauty, a love story of multi-dimension, and a healing experience for all who know the Viet Nam War.

John Shors has become one of my favorite authors of the 21st century.  I believe he is the voice of our recent past, and a voice of the humanity in all of us as we struggle to keep what is good and moral against a tide of selfishness and instability in our world.

Mr. Shors is an author of exceptional capabilities with characterization conveying feelings and angst that will so touch your heart that you feel actually set within the place and time with his characters.

Having lived through the Viet Nam War as a child of the ’60′s, I found this book especially interesting.  I have not been able to read about the War, per se.  It was a time of loss and anger and confusion for me.  A time I just haven’t cared to scrutinize.  But, this book gave me a way of “looking” that was thoughtful, caring and healing.

Through the eyes of Iris, the daughter of a Viet Nam veteran left with post traumatic stress syndrome and memories he could only heal by going back to create a home for street children;  we see, hear, smell and feel the thriving, messy, whirling, beautiful, dangerous and noisy place called Ho Chi Minh City — formerly Siagon.   I found many of the things surprisingly familiar to me…through pictures that were flashed daily on the t.v. when our boys were over there, I suppose.  I could see through Shors writings the brightness of colors, smell the food, hear the horn blasts, and shiver at the sufferings.   John Shors didn’t miss a beat. 

Iris goes to Viet Nam to continue her father’s dream and to help the street children, bringing with her a life-long friend…a now wounded, permanently handicapped vet. of the Iraqi War, who is suffering and suicidal.  This character boldly gives the reader insight into all veterans returning with injuries of body, mind and spirit from the horrors of war.   Along with an eternally hopeful Vietnamese woman, they work to complete the Center for Street Children that will become the catalyst for their own salvations.

Through their work,  inspiration, and close companionships with a little group of starving, abused and critically ill children, Iris and Noah find a new place of rest for all.  And, that included me.

I highly recommend this book for all and everyone.  John Shors is an author who needs to be read because he will be one to make a mark in these coming years.  He’s an American writer of note and value.

I also recommend this book because it’s good for those of us who have come through the Viet Nam War (a war not successful and not popular with the American people) and are going through the Iraqi/Afghani War…another one which may have a similar outcome.  We might find some solace in the fact that we will survive.   Timely and healing….  please read this book for many reasons.

Your Bookish Dame

Books I’m Anxious To Read Before 2011

I simply cannot believe we’re fast approaching a new year and I’m way behind in all the books I wanted to read this year!!   Now I have to make a list of those I want to finish before January 1st, 2011:

1)   The Iron Duke  by Maljean Brook

2)   The Widower’s Tale     by    Julia Glass

3)   Mothers & Other Liars   by   Amy Bourret

4)   Dark Origins ~ Level 26      by   Anthony E. Zuiker with Duane Swierczynski  (NEW! Access digital cyber-bridge videos..immersive storytelling experience)

5)  Look Again      by   Lisa Scottoline

6)   Adam and Eve        by   Naslan

7)   The Windup Girl      by   Paol Bacigalupi     (a steampunk novel….Hugo & Nebula prize winner for 2010)

8)   33 AD by David McAfee

  *I’ve begun this great book and will soon be writing my review on it.  It’s a fantastic Vampire novel with a bizzare twist that’s not to be missed!  David was kind enough to send a copy to me with a personal note.   I’ve been slightly afraid to read this book, though…        You’ll see why when you search for it!!!

See  www.amazon.com    for link to these books above……

There are several more that I’ve started and need to finish quickly, but the above are the ones I simply have to read before it’s too late! 

Let me know what’s on your “Before the New Year List.”     I’ll be busy making my “Books I Have to Read This Winter List!”

Your Very Bookish Dame